Skip to content

PyCon 2008 – Day One Keynotes

Friday was the opening day of the Python conference – it was also Pi Day (3/14). I headed off to the keynotes hoping to find out a bit more about what is happening with Py3k (or Python 3.0 as it will probably be called after release) antidepressant lexapro. David Goodger opened with some interesting stats. 2008 is the biggest PyCon and there are over 1000 attendees, a whopping 70% increase over 2007! They have a 45mb internet connection, so it’s a pity that it’s near impossible to connect to the Wifi.

The first keynote from White Oak Technologies was the story around their use of Python. As a consulting organisation they are presented with challenge when deploying Python solutions for clients. They outlined various ways that clients would push back on the use of Python and how they turned these into opportunities. Nothing really special here but it’s interesting to hear that people are having success when challenging other developers and management on the use of Python.Реставрация мебели своими руками

Up next was Guido van Rossum, the creator of Python. His primary goal was to give us an update on the progress of Py3k and Python 2.6. Apparently both are scheduled for release in August. I would assume this is only tentative as they are only at the alpha stage at present. I knew the Python language had been in existence for some time, but I didn’t realise it actually started as an academic project in 1989.

It’s age appears to be part of the problem for Python in 2008. Design decisions around character encoding (no unicode by default) and locking in the interpreter are a contentious issue for a lot of people. The latter issue is not going to be fixed according to Guido but unicode is going to be the standard since there is less of a performance hit today.

Guido is still recommending the 2.x branch of Python for the next few years. Obviously there are performance and reliability concerns for early migration to 3.0. This is good to know since I know that IronPython will be able to key up with the pace of the CPython schedule.

Comments are closed.

Behind the Weblog

Brian Lyttle - portrait photo by Sarah Gray ;)Brian Lyttle runs Source Foundry, a consultancy that specialises in Web development and content management. When he's not writing code and experimenting with the latest tools, you can find him honing his photography skills or helping Bill to improve his Mazda Miata.

I update my link blog regularly. It's powered by del.icio.us so you can subscribe to the RSS feed.

This Weblog is an experiment, and will focus on a broad range topics ranging from marketing to software, and anything else that comes to mind. These are my views and do not represent the views of any employer or client.

I'll be attending RailsConf 2006. Where will you be?

Archives

Useful links